FrankenForth: Looking Back

So over on Google Plus, Kyrinn (S. Eis) asks:

"Looking back at 3rd, how do you like how F4th is holding up, or exceeding?"

The very short answer is that it's exceeding in every aspect, but then this is a D&Dish game that I specifically designed to do everything I wish D&D would have done in the first place.

So, yeah, you could say there's some bias, but I'm very pleased that all the things I wanted to do ended up working out in actual play.

The longer answer:

We've been playtesting FrankenFourth for quite some time, with a bunch of different people, in a bunch of adventures and campaigns (some we came up with, others converted from 3rd- and 4th Edition just to see how easy it would be, which it is), and a bunch of different characters.

While it started as a 4th Edition Dungeons & Dragons hack that I originally ran with Melissa and the kids by the book (I wanted to make sure I hated the staggering amount of hp as I remembered), we gradually stripped virtually all of the 4E specifics away: the last thing to go was I think Defenses, which got flipped back to 3rd Edition saves after a poll. So, to everyone that utterly despises 4th Edition, give it a look anyway because it's not what you think.

We also kept changing and adding new stuff to the mix. This eventually resulted in, among other things, characters no longer requiring magical healing in order to get by, the cleric's per-day Favor mechanic, the wizard's unpredictable and dangerous magic, multiclassing that results in more organic character progression, more control over how complex your character is (fighters aren't the training wheels class), and monsters being able to challenge characters within a much wider level range.

All of this addresses nearly every problem I've had with every edition of Dungeons & Dragons (might actually address them all, but maybe I'm forgetting something).

I'm no longer going "Why is gold the default currency for PCs? It'd be nice for them to have something to aim for", or "Man, magic doesn't make any sense but that's the way it is, I guess I'll just deal", or "Kobolds sure can take a bunch of whacks (and why are they little dragon people?), guess I'll halve hp like basically everyone else does", or "Why do I choose a class feature at 2nd- or 3rd-level that locks in a bunch of other choices down the line? Why can't I just make some choices?"

The even longer answer (broken up into sections for your convenience):

Simple-Yet-Flexible Characters
One thing I didn't like about both 3rd and 5th Edition, is that too often you're stuck with whatever the game designers give you, when they give it to you. 5th Edition adds a bit of flexibility with subclasses, but these basically lock in a number of class features down the line: you can't change them later, even if it makes sense.

4th Edition gives you a considerable amount of flexibility, but characters are really complex right out of the gate: everyone gets two things they can do all the time (in addition to other things they can do all the time, like basic attacks), a couple things you can do once in an encounter, another thing you can do once a day, and that's before you factor in class features, racial features, and feats.

I'm good at memorizing all that stuff (and I still have a lot of it memorized), but most of my group? Nooope. Plus, making a character usually took 30+ minutes (even with the Character Builder) depending on how many books you wanted to look through due to the staggering number of races, classes, powers, and feats available, plus skill powers and hybrid classes.

With FrankenFourth I wanted to give the players more control over character complexity, but keep the baseline low anyway. I'd say that character generation is generally faster than in 3rd Edition and 5th Edition (depends on what you're playing and familiarity), and waaay faster than in 4th Edition.

You generate your stats (you can roll them, but there's also an array if you want to speed things up/keep things "fair"/don't trust your players rolling without you present), pick a race, pick a class, and can either choose gear from a list or randomly roll your cash and do it that way if you want.

Classes grant class features (ie, things you get no matter what), and most let you choose one or more talents (ie, things you choose that let you do stuff that the class normally can't do, or make you better at doing stuff that the class can already do).

Fighters are (currently) the odd class out in that you basically start out getting +1 to hit and damage with every weapon. They used to only get one talent over a 5-level spread, but due to player feedback and some playtesting I decided to allow them to exchange their +1 damage passives for a talent of your choice.

So, if you want to play a simple fighter, you can: just stick with the defaults and take talents that give you passive bonuses like Slayer (+1 damage with a two-handed weapon). If you want to get more elaborate, you can pick up exploit talents (and even swap out your damage bumps for more).

Even the magic classes are in a similar boat, as there isn't a huge-ass list of spells and you can always opt for the simpler stuff. Wizards start with Detect Magic and Magic Missile, and get to choose three more: if you want to keep things simple and blow shit up, stick to the Evoker tree, and if you want to get more complicated, Enchanter and Illusionist have got you covered.

What's more, if you think your character is getting too complicated you can always go with the simpler stuff later, and vice versa if you get to a point where you think you can handle more complex options.

Functional, Organic Multiclassing
In 4th Edition multiclassing is very shallow: you spend a feat to basically gain a skill and a once per encounter or maybe day ability key to another class: rogue gives you Sneak Attack, and cleric gives you their Healing Word prayer. If you want, and you pretty much won't, you can spend more feats to swap out powers from your class with ones from another class.

You're essentially burning feats merely to exchange powers, which is why my group houseruled it so that you just need to take the gateway feat and then can power swap however much you want later (it's not like you're getting more powers than everyone else). But, unless you wanted to miss a lot you still had to be careful what you picked due to the game's very tight math.

3rd Edition made multiclassing very easy and flexible: when you leveled up, you could choose just choose another class. Unfortunately, outside of some very specific builds it completely failed in its execution.

For example, let's say you make a 1st-level wizard. You don't know how to wear any armor, can use a smattering of shit weapons, only get 2 skill points, and have a spellbook brimming with cantrips and some 1st-level spells. Oh, you can also get a familiar: at the start of the game it basically gives you the Toughness or Skill Focus feat, except it can be killed.

1,000 XP later and you've leveled up. You decide to take a level in fighter. Whelp, all of a sudden you know how to use every simple and martial weapon (whether or not you actually trained with any of them), get +1 to all of your attacks, and can wear every type of armor and use any type of shield. You still only get the 2 skill points, but hey you get the fighter bonus feat (which wasn't nearly as good as auto-scaling spells).

The downside is you didn't learn any new spells and couldn't cast any more spells than you could before, and your Base Attack Bonus started to lag, both pretty big problems due to how all the numbers in 3rd Edition scaled.

FrankenFourth doesn't use leveled spells, and while monsters have levels aside from Wounds and Vitality it only barely affects some of their numbers. For example, a typical bandit's AC is like 11 or 12, while a dragon's AC is I think 14 or 15 (depends on age). Where they differ is that a dragon is insanely tougher and stronger: a 1st-level fighter would get maybe a good whack or two in before getting torn apart.

This has led to some very organic character progression that I don't think would work in 3rd Edition, and you can't even do in 4th by the book. For example, in our Age of Worms campaign Melissa's character Sumia started as a rogue, but during The Whispering Cairn found an owlbear cub. She wanted to befriend it and keep it around, and when I told her that the ranger class would let her choose the Animal Companion talent she jumped on that.

Fast-forward several more levels (mostly in ranger) and, frustrated by needing a light source to see in the dark that would also prevent her from sneaking around, she decided to multiclass into wizard for a Divination-based talent that gives her the ability to see in the dark. Yeah, the sustain cost eats up all of her mana, but it's the only thing she wanted anyway.

Magical Healing Isn't Mandatory
A big thing I hate about Dungeons & Dragons is that outside of 4th Edition magical healing is pretty much mandatory: you need someone to keep cranking out cures, and a case of healing potions and/or a healing wand (in 3E, anyway) is great as a backup.

We fixed that in FrankenFourth by giving characters a Vitality stat, which is basically a small portion of hp (about a quarter to one-third depending on class and Constitution) that recovers much more quickly than the rest (though it's very easy to flip everything over to pure hit points if you want, and you can control how long/how much Vitality is replenished).

Characters also have Wounds, which replenishes much more slowly: you regain a bit based on your level and Constitution after resting for the night. Your Wound Recovery is modified by your environment, too: you'll recover much more quickly by staying at a comfortable inn (though the ranger, druid, and barbarian will get class features or talents that negate penalties from resting in the wilderness).

Alchemical potions are readily available, but these don't work right away: currently mending potions restore lost Wounds at a rate of 1/round, but they also penalize your Constitution for awhile (which reduces your maximum Wounds), so if you drink too many too soon you'll die. Actually magical healing potions are far more rare, work much faster, and cure everything that ails you (including poisons, disease, broken bones, etc).

Dangerous, Unpredictable Magic (Sometimes)
Wizard magic in FrankenFourth is both unpredictable and dangerous: most wizard talents require the expenditure or investment of mana, often a random amount. I didn't make stuff like Mage Armor random, because then the wizard could cast it, roll, and if they rolled badly rest up and try again.

Anyway, when you use a talent that requires mana, you subtract that amount from your mana first. Not enough? Okay, the rest gets paid with your Vitality, and if that's not enough (or you're out of Vitality) it starts dipping into your Wounds. This cost is paid before anything else happens, so you can't sacrifice yourself to unleash a devastating spell: you just fall unconscious and maybe die before anything happens.

Sorcerer magic uses a similar system, but they get more mana, Wounds, and Vitality, and transform the more they use their magic (think Howl from Howl's Moving Castle). We're also kicking around the idea of reducing sorcerer costs and even making some abilities free when you certain conditions are met. Only downside is that their magical abilities are far more focused than a wizard.

Cleric and druidic magic is completely safe, but requires you to be in good standing with your god, and you can only regain Favor once per day for free: if you really need more, you'll need to offer up sacrifices to your god. What you can do is also restricted by your god's portfolio(s) and the Domain(s) you have access to.

No Pseudo-Vancian Magic
None of the spellcasting classes use what would be more accurately termed as pseudo-Vancian magic (which again doesn't make any sense). Some share mechanics (wizard and sorcerer, and cleric and druid), but that's only when it makes sense to do so. Still gotta hash out warlock and psychic characters.

I will be adding in a Vancomancer at some point, which will use actual Vancian magic because contrary to what you might have heard it does in fact make sense.

Mythological Monsters
For the most part we're sticking with the mythology whenever we can find actual concrete information about it.

Like, we're not calling gorgons medusas and metal bulls gorgons, kobolds are halfling-sized and -shaped spirits (not little dragon people), angels aren't just a bunch of dudes with random skin colors and wings, ghouls can steal your face, change their shape, and can't paralyze you, vampires won't by default be harmed by sunlight, and chimeras are a lion with a goat head sticking out of its back and a snake-tail.

Ogres look a bit different. Ditto for rakshasas, which will also have a much different array of abilities. Really you can go through our Dungeon World monster classes to see where we're going with some things. Some things will be harder to deal with than others, like djinn, but we're doing what we can because more often than not the actual mythological source is much more interesting that what you get in D&D.

Related, many monsters are also going to have things you can harvest from them. So while a hellhound doesn't have a need for treasure, its hide can be made into fire-resistant armor (or just sold if you don't need/want it).

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

Dungeons & Delvers is also on Kickstarter now: check it out, and if it looks like something you'd enjoy give it some support!

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FF/ASW: Escape From The Cambion Cube

Cast
  • Asheal (level 4 ishim wizard)
  • Hordac (level 4 tachon battlemind)
  • Rust (level 4 scion nomad)

Summary
The party woke in a cramped chamber. It was uncomfortably warm, and only dimly illuminated by pulsing crimson runes carved into every surface. Unsure where they were or how they got there, they felt the walls for a means of escape. When nothing was found, Asheal resorted to her arcane sight.

Magic radiated from every surface, but a pattern along one of the walls hinted at a something like a door.

They searched the area, but when they were still unable to locate a button or handle Rust used his psychic powers to collapse space near it: while it didn't destroy the wall, it did briefly pull some of the panels away. He tried again; this time Hordac grabbed onto one of the panels, preventing it from returning to the wall and giving them a small opening to escape through.

The room beyond wasn't much different from the one they were in, just bigger: it was still dark, warm, and there were glowing runes everywhere. There were also several skeletons wrapped up in bladed chains, but they didn't get a chance to do much before Rust destroyed them by warping the fabric of space all about them.

An opening appeared in one of the walls across the room, and a horned cambion peeked in to see what all the tumultuous rippling of space was about. When he spotted the characters he ordered a bunch of burned, naked warriors wielding nothing but jagged blades to kill them.

There were also three more skeletons in another part of the room, but even though they all ganged up on Hordac he was able to weather the damage thanks to his psychic skin-hardening. While trying to support him Rust lost control of his powers and went partially out of phase

Since Rust could now move through walls he managed to sneak up on the cambion overseer, and nabbing his sword before returning to the fray. The overseer also had a flaming whip, but he didn't get a chance to use it much before Asheal pelted him with some magic missiles and Hordac ran him through.

With everything sliced and scattered apart, Asheal observed that there were more magic-wall-doors regularly spaced along the walls, suggested more cells like the one they woke in. But, when Rust and Hordac attempted to open one, Rust ended up accidentally freezing himself in space, which was about the time a pair of lesser hellcubes rolled into view.

They both began clicking and changing shape: Hordac grabbed one to halt its transformation, but Asheal just stared at the other one because she wanted to see what would happen: numerous lengths of bladed chains burst forth, forcing Hordac to drop the one he was holding in order to mostly evade them. This allowed it to complete its own transformation and summon a fallen cherubim.

Rather than fight the demon, Hordac rushed over to the hellcube and hacked it apart. As he theorized this caused the demon to vanish. They then set about destroying the last hellcube before it could reset and do something else, and since it was late we stopped the session there.

Design Notes
Really this is it for this adventure. I might try running it again in, but due to work, Shane (the player of Hordac) probably won't be able to play for quite some time. Definitely going to publish this adventure for A Sundered World, though: I certainly planned more than enough material (which I'll gradually reveal as I start doing the art for it).

Got to playtest the new nomad power suite. Adam thinks that the Tear Difficulties are a tad high: he wants to try lowering them, while also reduced what each of them does because it was very easy for him to take out groups of enemies. Might be awhile before we get around to it though, since we're going to try a more "normal" campaign setting to better playtest the paladin, barbarian, druid, ranger, and sorcerer.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

Dungeons & Delvers is also on Kickstarter now: check it out, and if it looks like something you'd enjoy give it some support!

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Dungeons & Delvers Kickstarter is Live!

The Dungeons & Delvers Kickstarter went live yesterday, and we're (as of this posting) already over a third of the way to our goal!

If you haven't been keeping up, it's basically a rules-lite dungeon crawling role-playing game geared towards kids, but still fun for everyone.

We've been playtesting it off and on for a few years now, both with our kids and our adult Hangout group (in addition to various one-shot games and letting other people take a look at the document).

So, the rules are basically done, we really just need to finish writing one of the races and a couple classes, and wrapping up the art (which will take the most time since I'm still not used to the chibi-style).

If you wanna see the game in action/hear what a group thought about it without any input at all from us, you can watch this video by the guys from Skinner Games:



Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

Dungeons & Delvers is also on Kickstarter now: check it out, and if it looks like something you'd enjoy give it some support!

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Dungeons & Delvers One-Shot With Skinner Games

The folks over at Skinner Games took the latest version of Dungeons & Delvers for a (pretty lengthy) spin: if you're curious what they thought about the game (especially without any guidance from its creators), give it a watch (or listen, it's nearly three hours long)!



Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: The Cover & Other Art

Aaand here's the pretty much finished cover for FrankenFourth (courtesy of Melissa):


Here's a few other bits of art (not to scale):


Chimera, death cultist, and ogre (I'll let you figure out which is which).

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: Age of Worms, Episode 510


Cast
  • Humal (level 9 wrathful cambion wizard)
  • Corzale (level 9 dwarf war cleric)
  • Sumia (level 9 elf rogue/ranger)

Summary
The party pursued the maybe fleeing Bozal-Worm, retracing their path back to the Coenoby. They were delayed by a pair of Kyuss zombies that Bozal-Worm had deposited in the first flooded chamber, and by the time they caught up the Coenoby guards had been transformed into more Kyuss zombies.


Humal used his magic to conceal Sumia from sight, allowing her to easily slip past them. She found Bozal-Worm for some reason attempting to unsuccessfully wriggle his way into one of the gladiator bedchambers. Sumia returned to Corzale and Humal, and after informing them as to what she had seen they—with the help of Humal's magic and chameleon cloaks—took turns sneaking by the zombies.

By that time Bozal-Worm had withdrawn from the room, dragging two unconscious figures along with long tentacles. One was an elven woman that they'd only seen a few times during their stay, the other a male human that they knew to be the eponymous leader of Auric's Warband. Bozal-Worm slurped up the elven woman, but before he could do the same to Auric, Corzale charged in and struck the tentacle: her maul's radiant light reduced it to ash, and Auric's barely conscious form fell to the ground in a heap.

Countless thin, razor-sharp filaments exploded from Bozal-Worm's body as he bellowed with rage. They flailed wildly about, slicing everything they touched. To make matters worse, the Kyuss zombies also rushed to their progenitor's aid.

While the party busied themselves trying to destroy the Kyuss zombies, Bozal-Worm scooped up Auric in his mouth. Sumia suddenly heard Filge's voice in her mind urging her to save him; without hesitation she scrambled up Bozal-Worm's back and began sawing through what she hoped was his throat. Corzale rushed in underneath Bozal-Worm, hoping to make it harder for the filaments to harm her, and struck at its underside. This exposed Auric, and Sumia shouted at Humal to rescue him.

Humal commanded his chimera skeleton to haul Auric out of Bozal-Worm's gullet and carry him beyond the range of the filaments. Bozal-Worm barely managed to gurgle out a protestation before Humal's cockatrice skeleton tore it apart, causing it to melt into a heap of necrotic filth. Corzale was the first to burst forth, screaming in agony and desperately trying to heal herself.

Auric didn't seem to be breathing, but before Sumia could try administering a healing potion a Kyuss-zombie-formerly-known-as-the-mysterious-elven-woman emerged from the filth and dashed towards Auric, dagger in hand. They weren't sure why Bozal wanted Auric dead so badly, but that was enough to tell them that they needed to keep him alive: Corzale blasted her with divine light, Sumia stabbed her with the cursed dagger, and Humal's cockatrice skeleton unceremoniously crushed her underneath its massive talons.

Sumia proceeded to administer the potion, which instantly healed Auric's wounds. Once revived he was understandably confused and frightened. He ignored the characters' questions and explanations as he scrambled about looking for a weapon, but was eventually cornered by Humal's undead minions when he retreated to his team's chamber.

They tried to explain that the massive green worm was Raknian's doing, but he refused to believe them: as a regular at the Champion's Games he'd known Raknian for years, while the characters were both strangers and his opposition. To speed things up Humal charmed him, and while he became far more amicable maintained that the worm-creature must have been an attraction that simply somehow escaped from the monster pens.

With at least a few guards dead and Raknian's plans presumably foiled, the party opted to slip out of the arena after nightfall, bringing Auric with them just in case. The safest place they could think of was the hopefully still vacant lair of the thulid transmuter; they decided to hole up there for a few days to recover, and give Humal a chance to brew up some doppelgangers.

Auric delivered a message to Ekaym on their behalf, informing him that they were still alive, that Raknian had murdered his sister, and had intended to use a massive undead worm-creature to do something that also involved Auric for some reason. Having miraculously escaped the disastrous event unscathed, Sumia snuck out a few times, and while observing the arena and Raknian's home learned that he had mysteriously vanished.

Design Notes
It was nice seeing that the PCs were able to fight Bozal-Worm's undead throng last session, and then keep up the chase without having to rest. Didn't get a chance to see how the wizard's partial mana recovery worked out (it's now 1 mana point per level, per 10 minute period of rest), but Humal had enough to do what he needed to do anyway so I guess that's good.

I'd intended to have the Filge-mind-crystal speak to Sumia earlier (the one she found back in The Hall of Harsh Reflections), but I kind of kept forgetting about it. He's convinced her to implant it in one of the doppelganger's Humal is cooking up, so assuming he's on their team looks like they'll have more necromancy magic at their disposal.

This mostly marks the end of The Champion's Belt: we're just one adventure away from where the original 3rd Edition campaign left off!

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: Monster Preview

Here's three of the many monsters that will be featured in the FrankenFourth "black book" (most of the monsters will be illustrated, just depends on if there's enough space to put one in).


Initially this stat block was for a goblin, but (and I forget why) very early on someone suggested replacing it with a boggart and it just kinda stuck.

If you've played Dungeons & Dragons much of the stat block should make sense to you. If you haven't kept up with FrankenFourth's design and development, once we get to the Defense section a few things look different.

The first is Armor Class and DR. We started out having armor just be Damage Resistance, with shields upping your Reflex (and having melee and ranged attacks target your Reflex "defense"), but a lot of playtesting and a few polls later people really wanted to see saving throws.

So, Reflex got changed back to a saving throw (along with Fortitude and Will), Armor Class came back, and I ended up doing an AC/DR split with armor so that magical armor, special materials, and class talents wouldn't quickly and easily result in an insane amount of damage reduction.

The other thing that differs is the Wound/Vitality split. When you take damage you normally lose your Vitality first, then Wounds. Vitality replenishes fairly quickly (short rest brings some or all back), while Wounds requires a long rest and even then only a portion is healed.

Since for monsters it typically won't matter, we also give you the Total at the end.

After that it's basically business as usual, though we put in a treasure line. Originally I was going to do it more like older D&D, what with treasure types and whatnot, but this is easier than looking at a monster, then flipping to the treasure section to see what it means.


The cockatrice is one of many monsters that has stuff for you to harvest from it (rangers and druids have access to talents that let them harvest more from certain monster types). You can sell it to a sage or alchemist, but they can often be used to create things (assuming you know how to make something and have access to the necessary equipment).

In the case of the cockatrice, I could see someone with the alchemy crafting skill using its blood to make an oil to restore someone that got petrified (or even something for you to use on your own weapon to petrify someone you hit with it), and the feathers could be used to make magically petrifying arrows (or, since the cockatrice can fly, a cloak that would let you fly).

Some things have a cost (like alchemical potions), so it's a matter of having x sp worth of something to make it, but in many cases (like the magic arrows or cloak) it'll end up being the GM's call.


We went a more mythological route with the ghoul (as we did with the Dungeon World version), giving them abilities to change their shape and steal faces. The treasure line points out that the ghouls' treasure is in its lair (by default any treasure listed is either carried on its person or must be harvested from it).

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: Another Druid & Fighter Playtest


Cast
  • Merric (3rd-level human fighter)
  • Pikala (3rd-level elf druid)

Summary
Merric and Pikala arrived at a village just in time to catch a post rain-calling ceremony mishap: apparently the sacred stone disk used for the ritual doubled as a cap to a pit leading to a section of the underworld; while the priest was able to complete the ritual, one of his assistants failed to stop it from rolling off of the cliff and shattering on the ground below.

This was quickly followed by a group of lemures emerging from the pit. Very slow and very stupid, it was a simple task for Merric and Pikala to destroy them, after which the village priest explained that he needed to venture to a nearby temple and retrieve a new disk. Since it was infested with harpies, he naturally wanted both of them to accompany him.

As harpies are wont to do, they initially attempted to keep their distance and charm the characters with their alluring voices. Not only were they both able to resist, but Pikala conjured a storm cloud and began blasting them with bolts of lightning. This forced them to close the distance in an effort to tear Pikala apart with their talons, but Merric interposed himself, suffering only a few scratches before the harpies were slaughtered.

The temple had been dilapidated through time and neglect. While the priest was occupied searching the rubble for an appropriately sized-and-shaped stone to bless, Merric and Pikala rummaged about for anything of value. They'd only found a few gemstones by the time the priest was ready to go, but at least they wouldn't be leaving empty-handed.

By the time they returned not only had more lemures crawled out of the pit, they were also accompanied by a dark-skinned, infernal warrior wielding a wicked spear and carrying a large shield. Pikala tried tying up the lemures with her nature magic, but had to quickly change tactics and focus on the warrior with Merric; even with their combined attacks, Merric was barely standing by the time they finished the warrior off.

Fortunately, without the warrior supporting them the lemures were of little consequence: Pikala didn't even have to use any of her magic to heal Merric. While the pair finished off the last of the lemures, the priest and a few other villagers replaced the stone disk, sealing the pit and preventing more from climbing out.

Design Notes
This playtest session was handled by Melissa, giving me a chance to play a sufficiently talented druid, though I only ended up using Call Lightning and Entangle throughout the session. Entangle is an area-effect attack that can also restrain on a failed save, while Call Lightning lets you continuously bombard a single target for a minute.

It only costs one Favor to activate (and can deal a bit more damage if there's a storm already going, such as one made using the Weather-Worker talent), but then unlike wizards and clerics, druids don't get an at-will magical attack.

Adam was much more satisfied with the fighter this time around, what with there being enough enemies for him to use his exploits on (especially Sweeping Strike). We all agreed that his AC was a bit on the high end: it's 17 right now, and that's without masterwork/magic armor or special materials. So, I'm gonna reduce shields to a flat +1 bonus and see how that works out.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

A Sundered World: Player Fragments Softcover Color Books

Took far longer than expected, but the softcover color version of A Sundered World: Player Fragments is now available. Hardcover and B&W versions are of course to follow.

If you already purchased the PDF, look for a print-at-cost discount link in your inbox (assuming your DriveThruRPG account is set so that you can be contacted, that is).



Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Modrons as Ambulatory Lament Configurations

Even though I'm a big Planescape fan the only time I recall using any sort of modron was for a player character, but for some reason today I had this idea to make at least the cube-shaped modrons (duodrones?) into walking, self-changing Lament Configurations.



I figure that they'd each have a few configurations that let them summon various types of demons, bind creatures in hooked chains, and even manifest a region of hellspace around them. No limit to how many times they could "cast" a spell, but the casting time would be 1d4 or more rounds.

LESSER HELLCUBE
Level 2 Medium Construct
XP 10

Ability Scores
STR +0 DEX +0 WIS +1
CON +2 INT +3 CHA +0

Defense
Initiative +0
Speed 30 feet
AC 12 DR 2 (metallic frame)
Fort +2 Ref +0 Will +1
Resist fire 10 Vulnerable radiant 5
Immune disease, poison, sleep, charms
Wounds 14 Vitality 0 Total 14

Offense
Gore +1 to hit; 1d6 piercing damage

Bladed Chains (1d4 rounds): One creature within 30 feet suffers 5d6+3 slashing damage and is restrained (DC 14 Strength check to break free). If the target succeeds on a DC 14 Reflex save, they suffer half damage and are not restrained. Each round the target is restrained it suffers an additional 1d6+3 slashing damage.

Summon Demon (1d6+1 rounds): The lesser hellcube summons 1d4+1 fallen ishim or 1 fallen cherubim. If a creature grapples the lesser hellcube, they can make an opposed Strength check to force it back into its original shape and banish the fallen angels.

While I could see using other modron types/shapes, in 4th Edition Dungeons & Dragons modrons can combine into more powerful types (and break back apart when quantity matters were than quality): I could see these guys doing a similar thing, forming into larger cubes to wield more powerful magic.

Now that the players have wrapped up The Golden Spiral in our bi-weeklyish A Sundered World FrankenFourth playtest campaign, it's Melissa's turn to (hopefully) run something, which gives me time to run with this idea. Coincidentally, the home-base island that the players cooked up is cube-shaped...

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: Druid & Fighter Playtest

Cast
  • Merric (3rd-level human fighter)
  • Pikala (3rd-level elf druid)

Summary
Merric and Pikala were hired by a village to investigate a mining village several days upstream, to figure out why the nearby river had gotten so polluted, which would probably also answer the question as to why a previous group they sent to investigate hadn't yet returned.

The further they ventured the more contaminated the river became, until it was a viscous, black sludge slowly oozing past them. When they finally arrived at the mining village, the affects of whatever had altered the river were so potent that not only was nothing growing within a considerable distance, even many of the nearby rocks were crumbling to dust.

The streets were empty and quiet. Merric checked a random house, and was not surprised to find only corpses within. Pikala examined them and determined that they had died from severe poisoning. They didn't bear any wounds, which caused her to suspect the river water. She couldn't imagine anyone drinking from it in its current state, but it was the only lead they had so they continued following it.

They soon arrived at what could generously be described as a waterfall sluggishly dripping out of a large opening. Stairs hewn into the mountain side wound up towards it, but before they could ascend several zombies crawled forth from the river and attacked. Pikala temporarily restrained a few with conjured roots, giving her and Merric time to whittle the other two down before the rest could shamble over.

During the fight Merric was poisoned by their bites, but Pikala assured him that its effects were only temporarily (albeit prolonged). Pikala healed his wounds, and once the effects of the poison wore off they climbed the stairs.

The interior of the cave was completely dark, though they could hear what sounded like picks chipping away at stone. Unsure what to expect, and wanting to keep their hands free, Merric lead the way with sparse light from his enchanted sword. They observed numerous branching paths, with a handful of zombies scattered about oddly focused on the task of mining. Rather than wander about, the pair continued to follow the river.

It led to a fetid pool that was fed by a downpour of presumably fresh, pure water from above. While exploring its edges for the source of the corruption a basilisk emerged from the filth. The dim light made it easier for them to avoid meeting its deadly gaze, though even cursory glances were sufficient to ravage their bodies.

Pikala bound it in thick roots once it crawled out of the pool, and Merric managed to blind one of its eyes before it was able to break free (making it easier still to evade its gaze), after which it began savagely tearing at him with its numerous teeth and claws.

Calling upon the last of her magic, Pikala healed Merric's wounds and cleansed some of the venom coursing through his veins, keeping him alive long enough to continue occupying the basilisk long enough for her to drive her spear through its head, and finally slay the foul beast.

Design Notes
The purpose of this playtest was to test out the druid, as well as a fighter geared around maneuvers (as opposed to being hyper-focused on dealing damage).

Melissa's character started with the Entangle, Wildshape, and Renewal talents. I realized afterwards that I should have given her a couple more talents, since the druid is based on the cleric, which gets two Domains plus Lance of Faith at 1st-level, buuut there's always next time.

She didn't use Wildshape at all due to the time requirement, so I'll probably end up reducing it to a single action. I considered allowing you to spend a point of Favor to speed things up, but since Favor is a per-day resource I don't foresee anyone bothering with that, either. I suppose I could ramp up the effects of Wildshape to make it more tempting, but then I don't want druids to just focus on that and stay in animal form all the time, either.

Entangle was great: she was able to damage each of the zombies in the first encounter, plus trap a couple for a round or two, which gave the characters some extra time to whittle the others down. It was even able to keep the basilisk tied up for a couple rounds.

As expected Renewal was useful: it's based on the cleric's Healing Domain talent, after all.

Adam and I discussed giving the fighter more talents, because right now it only gets one talent choice at 2nd-level: the other levels are eaten up by passive attack and damage bonuses, plus multiattack. I didn't want to have to further nerf the fighter, but I also didn't want to load up the other classes with more stuff, so we settled on a rule that allows fighters to swap out their damage bonus for a talent.

Even doing so twice (giving him the Bodyguard, Sweeping Strike, and Trip Attack talents), his character was still exceptionally effective, and his high AC and Damage Resistance gave him a good deal of staying power (except against the basilisk's gaze attack, which ignores all armor).

The basilisk is one example of many monsters that can be harvested upon death. In this case the PCs were able to get 100 sp worth of basilisk blood, and 40 sp worth of basilisk hide. Adam likened it to Monster Hunter, which someone else has noted, but the only PS3/PS4 versions I've seen are (so far) only available in Japan. I've seen people describe God Eater 2 as monster-hunter-ish, so I'm going to pick that up since it's only like $30.

One of the players in our Thursday game will be unable to play after a few more sessions until he can get his work schedule sorted out, which might take upwards of six months. So, we're looking for at least one other player, though since we'd only have two players even if/when he comes back you'd still be able to game with us.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

A Sundered Fragment - Art Pack II

This art pack contains all of the art from A Sundered World: Player Fragments.

As with our previous three art packs, you can use the art in this pack in anything but another stock art collection (at least, not without asking us first), you can use it as much as you want, and you can edit it however you want to make it work. The only condition is that you need to credit us.

You can see a preview of every illustration in the pack over on DriveThruRPG, using either of the preview links.

Another Note: If you purchase using the PayPal Buy Now button, we will also send you a complimentary copy through DriveThruRPG. Please allow up to 24 hours for delivery, though it usually ends up taking maybe a half hour, and at the most eight (depends on if you buy it after we've gone to bed).

$3.99

$4.99


Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Design & Development: The Druid

I've been on and off working on the druid for awhile now—mostly trying to figure out how I wanted its magic to work—and it's at a point where we can finally playtest it (which we'll be doing this Thursday in place of our A Sundered World campaign).

Here's what it looks like right now:

Stats & Proficiencies
Wounds and Vitality would be on par with the cleric.

They can use claw bracers, clubs, daggers, darts, greatclub, longbow, quarterstaff, shortbow, sickle, sling, and spears.

They can wear light armor and use a light shield. Not restricting them from wearing metal armor (right now, anyway), because they can wield metal weapons.

Wildshape
This is an at-will thing, but it takes a minute (so you can't go back and forth in combat).

Now, our Dungeon World druid lets you turn into basically anything that's your size: you gain all of the new forms features and limitations (including, for example, flight and the inability to speak), and chose x options from a list, such as thicker skin, better natural weapons, and complete mastery over one of the form's abilities (ie, if your form lets you fly, you don't fly so clumsily).

I'm thinking a similar approach would work here, too, but with a generic stat block or two to determine things like default Speed, AC/Armor, and natural weapon damage. When you turn into an animal, you get to pick x options to beef yourself up, such as increased Strength, Speed (and flight, climbing, and swimming Speeds), and darkvision.

Also like our Dungeon World druid, you suffer a penalty to your Intelligence and Charisma (reflecting your mind becoming more primal).

Ranking this up and/or taking related talents lets you transform into things bigger and smaller than you are, plus plants and elementals, choose more options, and transform more quickly.

Druid Magic
From what I could find druids were, among other things, religious leaders, so the easiest way to handle druid magic would be to just give them Favor like a cleric. Clerics already have a sacrifice mechanic (a way to regain Favor sooner by sacrificing valuables), which also works well with druids what with all the human sacrifice.

Other things I'd considered (and might use for other classes):

Commune With Nature
You make a Wisdom check to do something, and if you succeed it happens. If you fail nothing happens, but like our nomad I could also have seen a kind of Calamity table if you nat 1'd the check.

Universal Recharge
If you haven't played 4th or 5th Edition, some monsters had abilities that would say something like recharge 5+. When they used that ability, at the start of their turn you'd roll a d6, and if you roll that number or higher they could use it again.

With this mechanic, when you use a recharge ability you can't use any other recharge abilities until you make the roll, but you could suffer Wound damage to give yourself a bonus on the roll in case you really want to use a recharge ability when your turn comes around. 

Weaker abilities would recharge on something like a 3 or 4+, while more powerful magic would require a 6. Also could have played with using larger dice, and letting you roll multiple dice and take the highest result.

Druid Talents
Here's a bunch of potential talents I also whipped up.

Barkskin
Grants AC/DR bonus when not wearing armor (or rather, doesn't stack with armor), but adds fire vulnerability 5. Rank ups increase AC/DR and reduce fire vulnerability.

Call Lightning
Single-target attack. Requires stormy weather or a bound storm elemental. Costs 1 Favor.

Chain Lightning
Prerequisite: Call Lightning
Spend additional Favor to have lightning bolt arc onto another creature.

Charm Animal
Prerequisite: Wild Speech
Charms on animal of your level or lower. Can only have one charmed animal at a time.

Command Water
Control water in an area. Can also make it attack. Costs 1 Favor.

Entangle
Area-effect attack that can restrain. Costs 1 Favor.

Pack Master
Can summon more animals. Takes longer. Limit by total level.

Reincarnation
Ritual that brings someone back to life as something else.

Rejuvination
Ritual that requires target buried in ground to increase healing.

Renewal
Touch a creature and heal them (prolly 1d8+Wisdom Wound points). Costs 1 Favor.

Speak With Plants
Communicate with plants. At-will, no cost. Might be required for Wild Speech.

Summon Animal
Prerequisite: Charm Animal
Ritual that takes x minutes (or spend 1 Favor to get it right away). Animal requires an offering of food or it flees. Can be up to your level, and you can only have one at a time helping you.

Summon Elemental
Ritual that lets you summon and bind elementals. Limited by your level.

Transfer Health
Living sacrifice grants health to another. Can also transfer Wounds between willing creatures (including yourself).

Tree Shape
Ritual, at-will. Turn into a tree that can slowly move about. Rank ups let you attack and move faster.

Tree Stride
At-will, teleport from tree touched to another you can see. Rank ups increase distance and let you teleport as a swift action and even an immediate action.

Wall of Wood
Prerequisite: Entangle
Exactly what it says on the tin. Extra ranks increase size and add thorns. Costs 1 Favor.

Waterbreathing
You can breath underwater. At-will. Can use a ritual to grant water breathing to others for a limited time.

Weather-Worker
Can change local weather. Ritual effect, or spend 1 Favor if you want it right away.

Wicker Man
Ritual that basically lets you make a wood golem. Level is yours when you make it, and rank ups increase the size.

Wild Speech
Can talk to any animal. At-will, no cost.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

FrankenFourth: Age of Worms, Episode 509


Cast
  • Humal (level 9 wrathful cambion wizard)
  • Corzale (level 9 dwarf war cleric)
  • Sumia (level 9 elf rogue/ranger)

Summary
As soon as Sumia finished describing as best she could the bloated amalgamation of Bozal and Kyuss worm within the room, there was a muffled groaning of metal. When she peered through the hole again the creature was gone. The pipe leading into the pump had been torn open, which begged the question: was it coming for them, or retreating?

The party swiftly retraced their steps through the southern hall and training room, and when they arrived at the hall that connected to the pump room a wave of dark green slime swimming with worm-ridden undead came cascading towards them. As the undead staggered to their feet, the Bozal-Worm emerged from the pump room—an act that took some effort due to its considerable size—and began gradually wriggling its way towards the waste chute.

With the hallway clogged with undead and dark green slime, it was impossible for the party to pursue the Bozal-Worm; at least it was also too narrow for more than a few of the undead to claw at Corzale as she held the line. Unfortunately, despite the Bozal-Worm's impeded speed and the undead's susceptibility to Corzale's twice-blessed hammer, by the time the last of the undead fell the Bozal-Worm had already vanished down the waste chute.

Apparently it hadn't intended on confronting them, but the question now was where was it going, and why?

Design Notes
Another short session because Jacob had to duck out early (real life can do that to you), so we spent some time after the game talking about various game stuff and armor.

I'm overhauling armor (boo...), but not the armor mechanics (yay!): added a few new armor types, shuffled some stuff about, grouped everything into light/medium/heavy categories, got rid of Speed penalties entirely (so Armored Mobility will probably end up being a slight increase to the maximum Dexterity bonus that a given suit of armor allows), and the new Armor Class/Damage Resistance ceiling is +5 for both (was formerly +4/+4 for plate).

This puts plate-clad warriors nearly on par with lightly armored, Dexterity-focused rogue-types (AC 15 versus 16, though you can grab a shield and also get a 16), which I'm fine with because heavy armor also gives a buttload of damage resistance. Plus, as with A Sundered World you'll be able to purchase armor (and weapons and other things) made from special materials, namely mithril and adamantine.

In terms of the actual adventure (The Champion's Belt), I changed how the Apostalic Scroll can be interacted with such that a party can actually do something with it, which has caused a huge shift in the expected course of events in this adventure, and I'm totally okay with that. It'll be really interesting if the party fails to stop Bozal-Worm from doing whatever it is he intends on doing (I know, but they don't).

Showcased where we are with the cover art on this post. The basic game is virtually done, just gotta do a few more bits of art and reorganize some of the writing, which will give people more time to submit feedback.

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

Design & Development: The Nomad

I based the nomad from A Sundered World loosely on the psychoportation psion specialist from 3rd Edition's Expanded Psionics Handbook, but rather than give it something like per-camp power points, we opted for a roll-and-hold move that lets you do things like teleport and manipulate things from a distance (including "manipulating" a sword into a creature's guts).

(If you want to see more details, I posted a preview of the class awhile back, and though A Sundered World was released just over a year later it's still very close to the final iteration.)

Since FrankenFourth is more of a traditional Dungeons & Dragons thing, we started out giving the nomad power points that recharged during a short rest. The idea was that this would allow Adam (Waive's player) to utilize his psychic powers more often, but when shit hit the fan he ended up just hanging back and burning through his power points tele-stabbing things.

Granted this strategy was effective at both killing monsters and keeping Waive alive long enough to take their shit, it just failed to properly evoke the feeling of a highly mobile mind-mage, so we're going to strike out in a drastically different direction. The first thing is that most if not all of the nomad's stuff is going to be usable at any time...

BLARGHLARGH GAME BALANCE!?!??!
...with some caveats.

The first is what we're calling the "ripple" die. Reflecting the ever changing spatial fabric, the ripple die is rolled at the start of every round, or whenever the nomad tries to do something outside of combat (unless he happens to do two things in the span of 6 six seconds). It starts at a d4, and whatever value comes up determines the range of many nomad powers. As you level up, the die increases, and doing certain things can further modify it.

For example, short range teleports will be the ripple die's current value x 10 feet. If you roll a 4, then great you can teleport 40 feet that round, but if you get a 1 then you can only go 10 feet.

Same goes for the nomad's teleport-stabs, sensory projection, grabbing/placing things beyond arm's reach, and so on. We know that some people consider teleporting to be a super-big-game-destroying-deal (think of the pits and walls!), but we're hoping that the variable and overall limited distance will prevent what I suppose some would consider abuse.

The next thing are "tear" abilities.

Adam had initially pitched this idea back during A Sundered World's development. The idea was that fold (the hold currency that the nomad uses for many of its abilities) would be used for more passive things like teleporting, while a "tear" currency could be gained and used for more destructive powers. I'm not sure why it didn't make the cut: maybe we couldn't make the mechanics work, or I didn't think players would want to juggle two types of hold (in addition to hold from defend and potentially other moves), but we're giving it a shot this time.

These are for when the nomad wants or needs to risk tearing open the fabric of space for various reasons. Examples we've cooked up in a pair of G+ comments are to give you a bonus to the ripple die on the following round, dealing area-effect damage (based on the fabriquake move from A Sundered World: Player Fragments), creating a zone where everyone is hasted or slowed, teleporting a creature away (with or without damage), and even shuffling everyone in an area about.

Though these are also usable whenever, the nomad must make an Intelligence check each time he gives it a shot. Failure means rolling on a Calamity Table to see how it backfires: could mean you take some damage or are dazed/stunned, but you could also accidentally summon something from beyond space and time. Ideally I'd like to have one Calamity Table, but depending on how many tear abilities we cook up they might each have their own (or there might be a few tables and each ability will refer you to a specific Calamity Table).

Finally, some nomad abilities will be usable whenever-if-you-have-enough-time, or be passive effects. An example of the former is a really long range teleport, taking 10 minutes or 10 minutes per x miles or something like that, and an example of the latter would be a talent like Making Waves, which bumps up the next ripple die roll by +1 for each 10 feet you move on your turn (encouraging you to stay on the move).

Announcements
If you're curious about FrankenFourth and/or Dungeons & Delvers, you can find public alpha documents here and here respectively.

The Rogue is our latest alternate-addition to the Dungeon World core class roster. If you want something different and/or more flexible than the thief, be sure to check it out!

Just released our second adventure for A Sundered World, The Golden Spiral. If a snail-themed dungeon crawl is your oddly-specific thing, check it out!

By fan demand, we've mashed all of our 10+ Treasure volumes into one big magic item book, making it cheaper and more convenient to buy in print (which you can now do).

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